The Spatial Disaster

Exploring bad website design is an enjoyably tragic experience; I stumbled across a new favorite in “High Calling Cockers” which is apparently a website for a Cocker Spaniel breeder…maybe?

  This is the home page you arrive at when clicking on the link. It isn’t that horrible, but the aesthetic is clearly poor and bland. A checkered background plagues the page drawing our eyes away from anything of “substance” with the lines.

Spatially the home page is very narrow, and there is weird awkward space between everything, fluidity is definitely an issue with how it is all broken up. The menu is where the layout begins to get confusing, looking at it you might see forty percent of it relating to the dogs themselves, but surprise they contain no information about selling these Cocker Spaniels or how to get a hold of one.  
Instead these new pages take you to an entirely different looking page with poems. The layout itself changes squishing everything on the page to the left leaving a distracting piece of empty space. In addition to the changing space that confuses the reader, every time you enter a new page a church hymn is automatically downloaded to your computer. I’m sure Sue, who created the page, had good intentions with this but it appears like it is some sort of spam-ware, and lowers her credibility with whatever it is that she does. While the design elements are extremely simple multicolored boxes of text next to a menu, the constant changing hinders the readers ability to take anything away from the website.

The one major thing that needs changing is the random unrelated pages attached to the menu. Sue even includes a “special pages” page that includes more poems, and a “Patriotic Page” with a poem about 9/11 and a background song. Try to tell me that these relate to her former job as a puppy breeder, or her new business selling quilts.

 

Works Cited:

Martin, Susan. High Calling Cockers. http://www.highcallingcockers.com/index.html                                                Accessed October 7th.